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social enterprise

Clean Food Needs Clean Money

Clean Food Needs Clean Money

Food from the “industrialized” food system is less nutritionally dense than organic, sustainably-grown food. Low-nutrient foods grown with synthetic chemicals have spread across the world, often targeted to the poor segment of the population in developed and emerging nations alike. This food and agriculture problem is too big to fix solely with philanthropic donations or government policy—even assuming a fully favorable policy environment and the effective deployment of philanthropic dollars. Here’s the good news: after decades of effective storytelling, public education, and advocacy by activists, we have a generation of Millennials embracing a broad-based behavioral shift toward healthy, sustainable food options.

Partnership Highlight: Accelerating the Future of Food

Partnership Highlight: Accelerating the Future of Food

Concordia is a nonprofit organization that enables public-private partnerships to create a more prosperous and sustainable future. As equal parts convener, campaigner, and idea incubator, Concordia is creating a new model for how a nonpartisan, nonprofit can have a global impact. The Concordia team recently connected with FoodFutureCo's 2017 cohort companies and shared the learnings from these conversations on their blog.

Hydroponic Paradox: Saving Water with Water

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Hydroponic Paradox: Saving Water with Water

The local food movement has deep roots in urban centers, but the juxtaposition of urbanites’ locavore enthusiasm with the shortage of arable land in cities raises the question: how local is local enough? In terms of geography, there is no consensus or regulation around what “local food” should be. Depending on your definition (or marketing strategy), the term could refer to anything from food produced in your own backyard to food produced 100 miles away or simply within the state. 

Community gardens and urban farming are obvious—if partial—answers to this paradox. And while urban farming is nothing new, there’s no denying that in recent years, rooftops gardens, vertical farms, and the like have become increasingly seductive to enterprising young farmers. Increasingly, consumers, the media, and even investors are climbing on board with new urban farming initiatives, as 21st century innovation pushes the limits of how and where food is grown. 

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Uprooting "Normal": How Food Hubs Are Reshaping the Food System

Uprooting "Normal": How Food Hubs Are Reshaping the Food System

With the growth of these aggregator models, we are reaching a tipping point. Now that there are more than 400 food hubs around the country, we have the beginnings of the physical infrastructure needed to support a new, alternative supply chain that sources exclusively from regional, sustainable producers with technology-enabled transparency every step of the way – once again putting a face and a voice to our food. As food ports scale, the next generation is emerging: food ports. These aggregate the smaller regional hubs and include processing, production, and distribution functions so that good, small, and mid-scale food can finally make its way into the institutional and large wholesale supply chains.

Can We Have Our Fish and Eat It Too?

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Can We Have Our Fish and Eat It Too?

Our oceans are straining under the extraordinary pressure of global demand. Humans eat seafood, and so do our livestock. Even our seafood eats seafood. It’s unsurprising then that ninety percent of our marine fisheries are fully fished or overfished. The repercussions of our insatiable hunger for seafood are both environmental and economic. The industry now loses more than $80 billion annually due to overfishing and decreasing fish stocks. 

Creating sustainable alternatives is not only an environmental imperative but also a remarkable economic opportunity. The expansive, lumbering seafood industry is calling for mission-minded entrepreneurs, innovators, and investors to stem the tide of ecological destruction. 

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Good Food is a Human Right

Good Food is a Human Right

Too often “good food” is written off as the pet project of the elite: access to healthy, sustainable food is a luxury. How wrong this is. Good food cannot be viewed as a “privilege.” It must be recognized as an inalienable right—one that we must fight for as a community, for the community. The effects of unsustainable, unhealthy food radiate out to every inequity facing humankind. Our food culture and agricultural system are central causes of climate change, the health crisis, the energy crisis, poverty, war, the list goes on.